Chin Augmentation (Mentoplasty)

Chin surgery, also known as mentoplasty, aims at creating facial symmetry by establishing balance and proportion. This procedure can be performed in a variety of ways, depending upon the underlying cause of the deficiency. The surgeon may reshape the chin by enhancement with an implant, by cutting the boney chin and moving it forward (genioplasty), or by reducing the chin bone. In many cases, this procedure may be performed as a complement to other facial contouring procedures such as a face lift, neck lift, cosmetic nose surgery (rhinoplasty) or other procedures.

Is a Cosmetic Procedure Right for You? Find Out!
Take the South Coast "Cosmetic Procedure Readiness Quiz"

Get important facts about the procedures you are considering and find out what options are right for you. Get Your Cosmetic Procedure Readiness score now.

The precise type and size of facial implants best suited for you will require an overall assessment of your goals, the features you would like to change and your surgeon’s judgment. If you are interested in this procedure, please contact South Coast Plastic Surgery and schedule a consultation with our surgeon.

MICROGENIA

For patients with a normal bite between the upper and lower jaws and a disproportionately small chin, a condition known as microgenia, a chin augmentation will help restore facial balance and symmetry. In this case, the procedure most often involves the placement of a silicone chin implant to augment or reshape the chin to restore facial proportion. Depending upon the specific type of microgenia, the surgeon will either lengthen the chin, extend the chin forward, or both. While horizontal deficiency is most common, some cases of microgenia involve horizontal and vertical deficiencies.

MALOCCLUSION

For patients with a significant developmental bite between the upper and lower jaws, also know as malocclusion, a chin augmentation will not fix dental misalignment complications or potential issues with premature wearing of the teeth and/or temperomandibular joint dysfunction (TMJ). In this case, orthognathic surgery is required to surgically reposition the upper and/or lower jaw bones to create proper occlusion and bit.

SURGERY

This cosmetic procedure is typically done under “twilight” anesthesia, and is often done in conjunction with nose and face surgery. Incisions may be located inconspicuously in the crease under the chin, or inside the mouth depending on patient preference.

RECOVERY

Most patients tolerate this surgery very well, and can expect to return to work within a week. Patients should expect a small amount of swelling, which typically resolves within a couple of weeks.


Call

Gallery

Directions